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Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
the coast is targeting many of the same residents who are still trying to recover from superstorm sandy just a little more than three months ago. in new york congressman peter king serves on the house homeland security committee and joins me now from long island. well, congressman, your community took such a heavy hit. how are you bracing for this storm? >> everything that can be done is being done, and sussex county is pulley mobilized. new york city is fully mobilized. one of the dangers we have, though, is many of peemt are living in homes that are still partially destroyed. this he may be living in the top floor of a two-story house with a bottom half of the basement destroyed. also, the shoreline has been dramatically weakened. even though the surges won't be as great as they were during sandy, it will be much harder to resist because of the shore lien that's been de stated so badly. we're hoping for the best. i guess one advantage is ok a friday night and into saturday at least the -- you know, the crews will be able to go out without worrying too much about traffic being in the way. y
in the northeast. you just lived through superstorm sandy, pommelled the region, that was back in the end of october. and one of the hardest hit areas, staten island, new york, that's where mary snow is today. tell me how people are doing, how they're feeling today. >> reporter: brooke, the thing that people keep saying is here we go again. this is a punch in the gut, and the last thing people here needed. look around me. get a sense of how much work still needs to be done. if we can just pan over, right near us is a tent where volunteers provide meals every day to people here on staten island, in ts section that was so badly damaged. that's where we met steve chatty. he's displaced with his family. he says he comes here every day for his meals. he says he can't believe that he's still living this way and is in disbelief that another major storm is headed here. >> to be honest with you, becoming numb as far as any weather related, you know, issues. we don't have anything left to lose anymore. we lost everything. so i couldn't worry more about it. it is not going to help with anything. jus
superstorm sandy are fresh in his mind and the mind of many people in the new york city area. new york city police commissioner ray kelly is here with me. we'll be talking in just a moment. we want to go to the north first and new england which has been getting pummeled through the day. this is one of the ten biggest storms in history. in boston right now, already breaking the record of 27 inches which was set ten years ago back in 2003. and that is the fear that made massachusetts governor duvall patrick to take drastic action. he said, if you are on the road driving after 4:00 this afternoon, you could face a year in jail. a significant step to make. "outfront," jason carroll, he's live in boston. ali velshi is live. jason, it has been a pretty incredible day there. and record snowfall throughout. what's it been like? >> well, i have to tell you, erin, condition here in boston are frankly miserable. it's a kind of icy snow that's been blowing around in your face. and just to give you an idea the condition of snow, earlier today it was very sticky. it's starting to become much more powdery
superstorm sandy, aren't sure how long the power will be out this time. >> couldn't get much worse. so, we're hoping for the best. >> reporter: in the rockaway section of new york city, it's a similar feeling of here we go again. this home was flooded during sandy, forcing sheila out for six weeks. this time, she's staying put. >> it's a little disheartening that we're getting just hit and hit and hit. >> reporter: learning the hard way, many decided to stock up on ice and gasoline for the generator. back on long island, the national grid that controls the power lines says this time around, the response will be faster because they, too, learned their lesson. making sure crews were in place before the snow started falling. what part of the storm concerning you the most? >> not only snow. but winds in excess of 60 miles per hour. >> reporter: now, it's up to crews like this team, called in from ontario, canada, to go to work. >> when the poles are on the ground, that's when this piece of equipment comes out. dig a hole, put a new pole in. >> reporter: that process, how long does it take? >>
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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